At the same time as Christians are faced with blasphemy again and again, a now famous EU draft regulation was released, demanding that the term “Christmas” be removed from language as part of the fight against discrimination.

Paweł Lisicki

Revolutionists were always irritated by Christmas. They rejected the belief that God descended into the world, that he was born of a Virgin, and that Christ grew up under the care of Mary and Joseph. The fact that the memory of this event and the image of the Holy Family have penetrated so deeply into the culture and customs of the entire Christian West – it is enough to recall the countless nativity scenes, renown works of art, beautiful Christmas carols, oratories, and stage performances; the fact that it became a symbol of hope, affection, and love awakened their anger and frustration. They were well aware that whoever wants to banish religion from life must remove its symbols and strip it of the aura of warmth and intimacy, which is exactly the message that Christmas spreads.

The first to successfully eliminate Christmas were the Jacobins in 1793. They introduced a new calendar, a new secular celebration. Churches closed and thousands of priests were simply murdered. This tradition was taken over by the communists.

The first official Bolshevik saint was a certain Nikolai Bauman, a close associate of Vladimir Lenin, sent by him to Russia in 1904. Stéphane Courtois writes that Bauman, “caused great controversy over a certain comrade he drew as the Virgin Mary with a child in her womb, in whom he questioned the father’s identity. The desperate woman hanged herself, and many comrades, including Martov [the leader of the Mensheviks – ed. P.L.] demanded that Bauman be expelled from the party. Lenin was against it, arguing that he was a good activist, and that was all that mattered”. Ultimately, a representative of the Black Sotnia issued a judgment on the Bolshevik blasphemer, which allowed Lenin to organize a gigantic funeral for the first martyr of communism. These were different times – when profanation could cause such a violent response. Today, equally disgusting, and perhaps even worse, attacks on Christians go unnoticed – the last act of such perversion was the cover of a German gay magazine, in which the leader of homosexual activists posed as Mary with a beard, creating, together with another homosexual, a mocking image of a rainbow family. This gentleman turned out to be an EU ambassador of the LGBT community.

At the same time as Christians are faced with blasphemy again and again, a now famous EU draft regulation was released, demanding that the term “Christmas” be removed from language as part of the fight against discrimination. This is not just any project, because the introduction to it was written by the European Commissioner for Equality, Mrs. Helena Dalli. She was disturbed not only by the insufficiently inclusive name of the holidays, but also other signs of Christian culture, such as the names “Mary” or “John”. Admittedly, after a wave of outrage – one of the few tools left in the hands of Europe’s inhabitants today – the Commissioner withdrew from the project for the time being, but it is difficult to rejoice over this as only a few days ago an e-mail was sent to this year’s assistants to members of the European Parliament. It was written by Adam Mouchtar, EP’s special political advisor. In a message titled “No Christmas wishes,” Mouchtar asked MEPs’ assistants to persuade them to stop sending Christmas greetings. The assistant states outright that wishes are “treated like spam” and are a nuisance.

Well, thanks to this, it is easy to see the ideological genealogy of contemporary EU officials and politicians, or at least many of them. This bodes well for the future: the fight against Christian symbols has always been associated with subsequent persecution. On the other hand, is this not the best proof of the vitality of faith in Christmas? Times change, but the power of evil is always focused in the same direction.

This article was published in December 2021 in “Do Rzeczy” magazine.